REPOST NY TIMES: Henry Stone, 93, Dies; Produced the Miami Sound

Henry Stone, who produced early recordings byRay Charles and James Brown and whose Hialeah, Fla., company, TK, was a fountain of disco in the 1970s and the source of what came to be called the Miami sound, died Thursday in Miami. He was 93.

His death was confirmed by his son Joe.

Mr. Stone was in the record business in Miami for more than 60 years, as both a distributor and a producer. A trumpeter as a young man, he arrived in 1948 after playing in an Army band during World War II and working in Los Angeles peddling records to restaurants and bars for their jukeboxes.

In the early 1950s he recorded a handful of songs, including “St. Pete Florida Blues,” on Rockin’ Records, one of the many labels he created, by a young blind singer, then known as Ray Charles Robinson, who would later go by the name Ray Charles. On De Luxe Records, he recorded “Hearts of Stone” by the Charms, which reached No. 1 on several rhythm-and-blues charts.

A friend and confidant of James Brown, who recorded for a competitor, King Records, Mr. Stone stepped in when Brown had a dispute with King. Identifying Brown and his band as Nat Kendrick and the Swans (Nat Kendrick was Brown’s drummer) to keep the arrangement secret from King’s proprietor, Syd Nathan, he recorded the instrumental “(Do the) Mashed Potatoes” and released it on the Dade label in 1960.

“One of the repeated lines was for someone to shout ‘mashed potatoes’ and Brown volunteered,” Mr. Stone is quoted as saying by the websiteHenryStoneMusic.com. “At the last minute I decided it was too risky using Brown’s very recognizable voice and turned to him and said, ‘You can’t do that! I can’t use your voice on this record because Nathan will” go after the label. “We have to leave your voice off and strictly make this an instrumental.’ I still liked the idea of someone shouting ‘mashed potatoes,’ but I had to use someone else.”

Mr. Stone continued to record rhythm-and-blues artists in the 1960s, but he focused largely on record distribution until several major labels decided to distribute their own product, forcing him to set up his own company, TK Records — named for Terry Kane, a sound engineer who built the recording studio. The company, which Mr. Stone ran with Steve Alaimo, a former pop singer, grew to become one of the industry’s largest independent labels during the disco era.

Its biggest hit makers were KC and the Sunshine Band, whose leader, Harry Wayne Casey, was a part-time employee at the company before the band began turning out a string of hits, including “Shake Shake Shake (Shake Your Booty),” “I’m Your Boogie Man,” “That’s the Way I Like It” — uh-huh, uh-huh — and “Get Down Tonight.” But the company and its subsidiary labels also released successful records by other artists — among them George McRae, Benny Latimore, Timmy Thomas, Betty Wright and Anita Ward — whose upbeat melding of funk, soul and disco came to be identified as the Miami sound.

When disco faded, so did TK, which ceased operations in 1981; one of its last recordings was “Another One Rides the Bus” — a parody of the Queen hit “Another One Bites the Dust” — by Weird Al Yankovic.

Henry David Epstein was born in the Bronx on June 3, 1921, and grew up for a time in the Washington Heights neighborhood in northern Manhattan. His father, Charles, a salesman, died when Henry was a boy. His mother, Leah, a seamstress faced with dire straits and two other children to care for after the stock market crash, placed Henry in an orphanage in Pleasantville, N.Y., where, having been inspired by the music of Louis Armstrong, he took up the trumpet.

He served in the Army during World War II, playing in an integrated band that was based in Fort Dix, N.J. After his discharge, he changed his last name to Stone and began his professional life in Los Angeles; shortly thereafter he moved to Miami.

Mr. Stone’s first marriage ended in divorce. In addition to his son Joe, he is survived by his wife, the former Inez Pinchot; another son, David; five daughters, Donna Stone-Wolfe, Lynda Stone, Crystal McCall, Sheri Watson and Kim Stone; 12 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

A documentary about Mr. Stone and the Miami music scene, “Rock Your Baby,” is in the final stages of postproduction, one of its producers, Mitchell Egber, said in an interview. In a clip from the film, Mr. Stone gives a pithy summation of his life’s main focus. “Instead of playing golf or pool,” he says, “I loved to make records.”

NPR Repost: Nat Adderley: Brotherly Swing

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Trumpeter, composer and bandleader Nat Adderley redefined the idea of “brotherly love” in a musical context. He devoted most of his creative energies to the band fronted by his saxophone-playing brother, Julian “Cannonball” Adderley, in which Nat played cornet, composed, managed the band’s money and generally looked after his older brother. Together, the brothers drove the Cannonball Adderley Quintet to great heights, in the process developing one of jazz’s greatest sibling success stories.

Adderley grew up in Florida during the 1930s in a household defined by education. The Adderleys moved from Tampa to Tallahassee during Nat’s infancy because parents Sugar and Julian Sr. planned to teach at Florida A&M University. Accordingly, Nat and Cannonball excelled at academics and music as children. The elder Julian played trumpet professionally throughout Florida, and he bought a trumpet for his oldest son, Julian Jr. When Cannonball switched from trumpet to alto sax, Nat got the hand-me-down horn, which his brother taught him to play.

Sugar Adderley urged her younger son to pursue law. “Nat was just as musical and musically inclined as Cannon,” she once said. “But I said, ‘One musician in the family is enough’ … and I thought that law would be a good field, ’cause he liked to argue.” But when Nat returned home from the Korean War — a duty both he and Cannonball fulfilled — he told his mother that he’d pass up law school. Instead, Nat accepted trombonist Buster Cooper’s offer to play trumpet in Europe with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra.

New to New York

In July 1955, after a successful tour with Lionel Hampton’s band, Nat met up with his brother and, on a whim, drove to New York City to visit Buster Cooper. On their first night in town, Nat and Cannonball made their way to the famous Cafe Bohemia. Cannonball edged his way onto the star-studded stage alongside bassist Oscar Pettiford, drummer Kenny Clarke and pianist Horace Silver. Before the evening ended, both brothers were onstage playing with their “new” band. By the end of the month, the freshly minted quintet had recorded its first album, Bohemia After Dark.

For five years, the Adderley brothers enjoyed tremendous success in New York. Cannonball’s prodigious style — marked by his ability to play blisteringly fast leads on alto sax — earned him the nickname “The New Bird,” after late alto great Charlie “Yardbird” Parker. Their material, much of it penned by Nat, often drew from R&B and bebop in a way that came to be known as “soul jazz.” Among their champions was Miles Davis, who immediately recognized the Adderley brothers’ talent and urged manager John Levy to handle their careers.

A ‘Straw Boss’

Though the Cannonball Adderley Quintet met with critical acclaim, it struggled financially. John Levy says that Cannon handled money poorly. “Cannon believed in really taking care of his musicians … we just didn’t make it,” he says. So beginning in 1960, Cannon fronted the band while Nat made sure they turned a profit. The younger Adderley took over the financial responsibilities, managing all of the band’s tours and earning himself the reputation of “straw boss,” while also playing trumpet and recording his own projects as a leader.

The brothers’ familial bond provided great strength to the band: “Everyone got along together very well,” drummer Louis Hayes remembers. “That was one of the main components to the band that made it such a great organization: that everybody was in tune with each other, on stage and off.” By the 1960s, Nat was also writing a majority of the songs, including the band’s greatest success, “Work Song.”

In 1966, the group, now a sextet, achieved the unthinkable when its hit single “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” — written by keyboard player Joe Zawinul — sold more than one million copies. When rock ‘n’ roll took over pop culture in the 1960s, the band changed with the times without compromising its music. Nat booked the band in venues like the Fillmore East, where its funky “soul jazz” reached a wider audience.

After Cannonball Adderley’s death in July 1975, Nat Adderley finished up the final tour with the remaining members of the sextet. Nat played with different bands until 1989, and along the way continued to discover and promote new talent, including saxophonist Vincent Herring.

In 1990, Nat found a new outlet in which to share his music: the classroom. He taught music theory at Florida Southern College for 10 years, sharing his knowledge and love of jazz until poor health took him into retirement. Nat Adderley died in Lakeland, Fla., on Jan. 2, 2000, of complications from diabetes. He was 68.

REPOST: Cause For Celebration: The Iconic Blue Note Records At 75 by NPR STAFF May 28, 2014

 

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Blue Note Records is the kind of record label that people like to call “storied” — so celebrated and impactful that no one narrative can capture its essence. From swing to bebop and hard bop, through fusion and the avant-garde, Blue Note has been telling the story of jazz in the grooves of its records since 1939 — and for its 75th anniversary, it’s releasing remastered vinyl editions of some gems from its catalog. But the real legacy of the label is too big to capture on disc.

Even on a stage as big as the Kennedy Center’s in Washington, D.C., where dozens of the label’s stars gathered for a special Blue Note at 75 concert earlier this month, the label’s history felt sprawlingly diverse: Elder titans like Lou Donaldson shared the moment with pop contemporaries like Norah Jones. You can see videos of four of those performances here, or zoom in on the label’s discography with a look at 75 great Blue Note solos here.

NPR’s Melissa Block went looking for the big picture as well, gathering stories and insights from the label’s current president, Don Was, and many musicians from throughout its history. Read quotes from pianist Jason Moran, organ master Dr. Lonnie Smith and others below, and hear the radio segment at the audio link.

“I can’t remember the first Blue Note album I bought, but I do know my very first favorite Blue Note record — and that would be Speak No Evil, Wayne Shorter. It’s almost like a really amazing underground hip-hop record that didn’t go mainstream for some reason; that’s how it sounds. It just has a certain mood, a certain darkness and a certain honesty.”

— Pianist Robert Glasper, who released his Blue Note debut, Canvas, in 2005

“You won’t see this on the Grammys, and that’s a shame. I always say that if the aliens came to Earth and they watched one of these award shows, would that be the best America has to offer? I sometimes am unsure of that. And I want to make sure that the best of what Blue Note Records has to offer, at least a small portion of it, is on this stage, presented in the most earnest and honest way possible.”

— Pianist Jason Moran (on Blue Note since 1999) on the importance of the Blue Note at 75 concert

“Blue Note captured you because of the liner notes and the cover art. There was an energy there; there was a hipness that you followed. The music followed the production, and the production followed the music. And you could just feel the love in each disc.”

— Saxophonist Joe Lovano. His Blue Note debut, From the Soul, came out in 1991

“Blue Note was the first to take the chance and the risk to record him as a leader — and not only did they record him as a leader, they called the recording Genius of Modern Music. That’s bold.”

— Library of Congress jazz historian Larry Appelbaum on Thelonious Monk’s Blue Note debut

“In this kind of music, change is part of the DNA. You’re supposed to play the music differently every night. You’re not supposed to repeat yourself; you’re always supposed to be pushing the threshold. So we’ve gotta continue to do that. I’ve never said no to something because it’s the wrong genre. I’ve said no to stuff — a lot of stuff — because I didn’t feel anything when I heard it.”

— Blue Note President Don Was

“Blue Note has a history. It’s a legacy. If they didn’t keep it up that would be a tragedy, because it’s just like the Empire State Building or the White House. It’s a monument. It’s part of life.”

— Organist Dr. Lonnie Smith, whose playing on Lou Donaldson’s Alligator Bogaloo won him aBlue Note contract in 1967

 

 

I Love You Dr Maxine Greene

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Maxine Greene

 

 

Maxine you will remain on my mind and on my heart for the rest of my life. Thank you for the many moments you shared with me. Your intellect, bravery, courage and elasticity to any situation presented to you is a real testament to what is needed and is good in mankind. I will miss you dearly. Maxine, I love you…

 

“There are no final words, but only questions.” – Maxine Greene

 

TRIBUTE TO MAXINE….

“[O]f all our cognitive capacities, imagination is the one that permits us to give credence to alternative realities. It allows us to break with the taken for granted, to set aside familiar distinctions and definitions” (p. 3).   – Maxine Greene

During this recent spring semester (2014) Teachers College, Columbia University I had the fantastic opportunity to take a course from Dr Maxine Greene. This experience truly changed my life forever. My time with Maxine helped change the why I imagine the world and my place in it. Her attitude is amazing, and I truly love her incredible curiosity for the varieties of freedom that exist in the world. She has become my intellectual mentor. Her positive comments have helped me be braver and sure of the direction that I am traveling in. Her works, “The Dialectic of Freedom” as well as “Releasing the Imagination” have given me tremendous amounts of reflective material to build my understanding of freedom, power and the connection that the imagination has to it. She and Stephen D. Brookfield have given me an insight into critical pedagogy and its place in current education.

 

Aesthetic experience is tremendous! Thanks Maxine for allowing me into your home and sharing your thoughts with me. I love you and admire your courage. I hope that I will be half as productive and courageous as you!

Maxine Greene (born December 23, 1917) is an American educational philosopherauthorsocial activist, and teacher.

American educational philosopher, author, social activist and teacher who values experiential learning in its “entirety”, Maxine Greene has influenced thousands of educators to bring the vitality of the arts to teachers and children.[citation needed] For Greene, art provided a conduit to mean-making, a way of making sense of the world. For more than 30 years she has been Lincoln Center Institute (LCI)[1] philosopher-in-residence.

Greene earned her PhD. (1955) and M.A. (1949) from New York University and a B.A. from Barnard CollegeColumbia University (1938). She taught at New York University,Montclair State College and Brooklyn College. In 1965, she joined the faculty at Teachers College, Columbia University.[2]

In 1973 she was one of the signers of the Humanist Manifesto II.[3] As Philosopher-in-Residence of Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education since 1976, Greene conducts workshops (especially in literature as art) and lectures at LCI’s summer sessions.[4]

In 2003, she founded the Maxine Greene Foundation for Social Imagination, the Arts, and Education.[5] The foundation supports the creation and appreciation of works that embody fresh social visions. Its goal is “to generate inquiry, imagination and the creation of art works by diverse people.”[6] Grants of up to $10,000 are awarded to educators and artists.

In 2005, she inspired the creation for the High School of Arts, Imagination and Inquiry[7] in association with LCI and New Visions for Public Schools.[8][9] The school encourages students to expand their imaginative capacities in the arts and other subject areas.

Greene is past President of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), Philosophy of Education SocietyAmerican Educational Studies Association (AESA), and theMiddle Atlantic States Philosophy of Education Society.

 

She is the recipient of honorary degrees in the Humanities from Lehigh UniversityHofstra University, the University of Colorado at DenverIndiana UniversityGoddard College,Bank Street CollegeNazareth College (Rochester, New York), McGill UniversityCollege Misericordia, and Binghamton University.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor from Teachers College and Barnard College; Educator of the Year Award from Phi Delta Kappa; the Scholarly Achievement Award from Barnard College; AERA’s Lifetime Achievement Award; and received a Fulbright Program fellowship, which took her to New Zealand.

In 2004, the Teachers College Trustees created the Maxine Greene Chair for Distinguished Contributions to Education.

 

Major works:

  • The public school and the private vision : a search for America in education and literature (New York : Random House, 1965)
  • Critical Literacy: Politics, Praxis, and the Postmodern (State University of New York, 1993)
  • Existential Encounters for Teachers (Random House, 1967)
  • The Dialectic of Freedom (Teacher’s College Press, 1988)[10]
  • Landscapes of Learning (Teacher’s College Press, 1978)[11]
  • A Light in Dark Times: Maxine Greene and the Unfinished Conversation, with William Ayers & Janet L. Miller (Teachers College Press, 1997)[12]
  • The Public School and the Private Vision: A Search for America in Education and Literature (Jossey Bass Publishers, 1965)[13]
  • Teacher as Stranger: Educational Philosophy for the Modern Age (Wadsworth Publishing, 1973)
  • Variations on a Blue Guitar: The Lincoln Center Institute Lectures on Aesthetic Education (Teacher’s College Press, 2001)[14]
  • Releasing the Imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts, and Social Change (National Association of Independent Schools, 2004)[15]

Other important works include:

  • Arts and the Search for Social Justice (Lecture at The Maxine Greene Foundation for Social Imagination, The Arts & Education, 2003)
  • Active Learning and Aesthetic Encounters (Talks at the Lincoln Center Institute, National Center for Reconstructing Education, Schools and Teaching, 1994)
  • Education, Freedom and Possibility (Russell Lecture, 1975)
  • Lending the Work your Life: A Celebration with Maxine Greene (Lincoln Center Institute, 2006)[16]
  • Naturalist-humanism in eighteenth century England: An Essay in the Sociology of Knowledge (Thesis, 1956)
  • A Teacher Talks to Teachers: Perspectives on the Lincoln Center Institute (Lincoln Center, 1980)

 

Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928 – May 28, 2014)

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Maya Angelou Quote

Maya Angelou (born Marguerite Ann Johnson; April 4, 1928 – May 28, 2014) was an American author and poet. She published seven autobiographies, three books of essays, and several books of poetry, and is credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning more than fifty years. She received dozens of awards and over thirty honorary doctoral degrees. Angelou is best known for her series of seven autobiographies, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences. The first, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), tells of her life up to the age of seventeen, and brought her international recognition and acclaim.

She became a poet and writer after a series of occupations as a young adult, including fry cook, prostitute, night-club dancer and performer, cast-member of the opera Porgy and Bess, coordinator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and journalist in Egypt and Ghana during the days of decolonization. She was an actor, writer, director, and producer of plays, movies, and public television programs. Since 1982, she taught at Wake Forest University in Winston-SalemNorth Carolina, where she holds the first lifetime Reynolds Professorship of American Studies. She was active in the Civil Rights movement, and worked with Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. Since the 1990s she made around eighty appearances a year on the lecture circuit, something she continued into her eighties. In 1993, Angelou recited her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at President Bill Clinton‘s inauguration, the first poet to make an inaugural recitation since Robert Frost at John F. Kennedy‘s inauguration in 1961.

With the publication of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Angelou publicly discussed aspects of her personal life. She was respected as a spokesperson of black people and women, and her works have been considered a defense of black culture. Although attempts have been made to ban her books from some US libraries, her works are widely used in schools and universities worldwide. Angelou’s major works have been labeled as autobiographical fiction, but many critics have characterized them as autobiographies. She made a deliberate attempt to challenge the common structure of the autobiography by critiquing, changing, and expanding the genre. Her books center on themes such as racism, identity, family, and travel. Angelou is best known for her autobiographies, but she is also an established poet, although her poems have received mixed reviews.

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